5. Stakeholders involvement

5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses

Awareness and understanding of the world of work is integral to education and is best achieved through businesses and schools working in partnership. Such partnerships produce significant benefits for all involved: most importantly, they benefit young people’s awareness and experience of the world of work, their understanding of job demands and employer expectations, and the relevance of schooling to employer needs.

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Please note that for the moment the content on the resource pages is available in English only.

JOPO - Flexible Basic Education

Finland has been developing innovative teaching methods and procedures to cater for individual needs through the use of activity based learning, small group teaching, on-the-job learning and different learning environments to reduce dropout.

Areas: 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Finland

My education, my job, my future

My education, my job, my future is a project that aims to prevent early school leaving and to encourage and inspire students to continue school.

Areas: 1. School governance; 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 1.3. School management; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Cyprus

Nordic Projects to Combat School Dropout

The aim of the report Nordic Projects to Combat School Dropout is to improve and inspire new initiatives for young people, and to create enriching contacts between actors and organisations in the Nordic region.
The Nordic Web Resource on Dropout from Upper Secondary Education was a project commissioned by the Nordic Council of Ministers and run by the Nordic Welfare Centre between 2012 and 2015. The aim of the project was to compile good examples of initiatives aimed at increasing the proportion of young people in the Nordic region who complete upper secondary education.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 1.3. School management; 1.4. Cooperation within education systems; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 2.4. Well-being of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 3.8. Targeted support - Language; 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 4.1. Communication and information; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Denmark; Finland; Iceland; Norway; Sweden

School innovation in Europe: promoting children’s continuous development through the integration of the school and day care centre and the application of the TASC model in the Warande school

In the past, the Dutch School Inspectorate notified the Warande school about their students‘ low results. The school staff, however, were very much hesitant towards the test-driven-accountability-approach established by the Inspectorate. Therefore, the school team decided to re-define and interpret test-driven accountability in their own way. Instead of emphasising the learning results per se, they wanted to focus on the process of learning itself – starting from children’s needs and guiding them in their own development.

To be able to focus on children’s continuous development, the school also felt the need to integrate the child day care, kindergarten, elementary education and after school care. These issues ignited the need for organisational and pedagogical changes. Overall, the school has been innovative during recent years, and latest innovative approaches represent a continuity of this process and reflect the school’s innovative culture.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Netherlands

School innovation in Europe: promoting students’ self-esteem and higher order thinking skills through curriculum innovation at the Willenhall Community Primary School

The school’s approach to teaching and learning is based on attaining educational excellence and achievement for all students. The school developed a stimulating curriculum which seeks to provide its students with an understanding of the learning processes in which they are involved (meta-cognition) – and to build their self-belief. The provision of specialist teaching in certain subject areas (science, music, art, physical education) is a key element in this process, as is the development of maths teaching throughout the school (for 6th graders). The teaching of philosophy to all students is also a vital element in developing students’ thinking skills, resilience and self-confidence. Curriculum innovation is undertaken on the initiative of the school, working in co-operation with its Federation partners at Whitmore Park Primary School. All staff, the governing body, students and parents are regularly consulted and made part of the process of curriculum development, and the school is strongly engaged with community partners in developing broader learning activities.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 1.3. School management; 1.4. Cooperation within education systems; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 4.1. Communication and information; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: United Kingdom

School innovation in Europe: promoting students’ social competences and teachers’ collaboration through informal learning practices at the 4th Primary School of Thiva

The school has been developing innovative practices of informal learning for six years (since 2011). The main aims of these innovative approaches were to improve the educational level of pupils and school performance, to promote their social competences and sensitivity to the surrounding community and to enhance cooperation between teachers. As the first step of the informal learning approach, the school aimed to create informal learning environments by renovating the school yard and make it suitable for the learning purposes. As a second step, the school designed various learning approaches connected to the yard and broader school community (e.g., focusing on environmental education, natural sciences, reading). In this process the school cooperated with external stakeholders (scientists, artists, craftworkers, museums, etc.).   

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 4.1. Communication and information; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Greece

School innovation in Europe: School innovation in Europe: non-formal learning and entrepreneurship training in the Economics High School of Buzău

The school practices several innovative initiatives:

- The ‘Exercise company’ supports students to go through all the steps of setting up a company, from the creation of its administrative structure to its daily management, supporting students’ entrepreneurship competences. This project is regarded very positively by the whole school community and national authorities.

- The ‘Different school’ (‘Şcoala altfel’) programme significantly changed the relationship between students and teachers, thanks to its flexibility. Coupled with the participation in trainings of non-formal education by the teaching staff and practices acquired during Erasmus+ projects, it helped to reshape the educational process at the school.

- Teachers have been involved in curricular innovation dedicated to their particular field of study (tourism and economics) while members of committees set up by the Ministry of Education and the National Centre for the Development of Vocational Education (CNDIPT) contributed to the renewal of the national curriculum.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.3. School management; 1.4. Cooperation within education systems; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Romania

Stop-Dropout!

The overall objective of the project is to reduce the drop out rates of learners in vocational education and training, by providing materials and tools for counsellors and trainers to develop their own skills in working with groups, to detect potential dropouts and the special characteristics of learners’ groups, provide support adjusted to individual needs, and thereby improve the quality of their vocational education systems.

Areas: 1. School governance; 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 3.8. Targeted support - Language; 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Austria; Czech Republic; Germany; Slovenia

Talk of the Town (ToTT)

The ‘Talk of the Town’ (ToTT) intervention was developed by The Communication Trust and ICAN – two UK-based speech, language and communication NGOs. ToTT was piloted across a small federation of schools (secondary and primary) in Manchester in an area of social deprivation in 2011- 2012 to address developmental delays in children’s speech language and communication (SLC). It is an integrated, community-led and systematic approach to supporting SLC in children and young people. The importance of detection and support of learners with learning difficulties before the problem is translated into school absenteeism is essential. Research has pointed to the need to identify at-risk learners and rapidly intervene at the appropriate level, in this case a targeted approach being the most applicable. ToTT follows a systematic process to embed strategies and achieve measurable positive outcomes. It was piloted with four key aims: 1. Early identification of children and young people with SLC needs 2. Joint working between parents and practitioners across health and education 3. Positive outcomes for children and young people with improved SLC skills 4. A sustainable approach, so that policy and practice continues to support positive outcomes.

 

 

 

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 4.1. Communication and information; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: United Kingdom

Transition Year - a broad educational experience

Transition Year offered by a number of Irish schools allows pupils (aged circa 15 years old) to acquire a broad educational experience with a view to the attainment of increased maturity. It takes place after having completed the Junior cycle (lower secondary) and before proceeding to further study and/or vocational preparation. It provides a bridge to help pupils make the transition from a highly-structured environment of the Junior cycle to one where they will take greater responsibility for their own learning and decision making.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Ireland

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