5. Stakeholders involvement

5.1. Multidisciplinary teams

A multidisciplinary approach to educational disadvantage and early school leaving (ESL) brings together professionals from within and beyond the school, including psychologists, social workers and health professionals. Multidisciplinary teams have the potential to offer a range of services to support young people at risk of educational disadvantage and ESL. This includes, for example, focus on children’s language development, mental health support, emotional support, bullying prevention skills, outreach to marginalised families and support for development of parenting skills.

Show more

Resources ( Search all resources )

Please note that for the moment the content on the resource pages is available in English only.

Manchester Communication Academy (MCA)

Manchester Communication Academy (MCA) works to improve outcomes for children, families and the community. This secondary academy opened in 2010 to serve one of the most disadvantaged inner-city neighbourhoods in England. From the outset, the academy’s sponsor, a large employer in the city, wanted the school to help to contribute to a vibrant and sustainable neighbourhood, and committed to addressing the many inter-related economic, social and physical challenges which characterise the neighbourhood. This mission has directly shaped the academy programme, which places equal importance on ‘teaching and learning’ and ‘social investment’. The school’s social investment department is a highly distinctive feature of its overall strategy for addressing the impacts of disadvantage on young people’s education and wider life chances.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.3. School management; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: United Kingdom

Multi-Interdisciplinary teams for early school leaving prevention

This paper seeks to examine evidence regarding the potential for multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary teams to play a key role in the prevention of early school leaving. As part of developing a strategy for such multi/interdisciplinary teams, an important focus is on necessary and supportive conditions for their effectiveness, rather than a deterministic assumption of their inevitable effectiveness. The report highlights the need to provide strong strategic guidance to the teams on important issues to be engaged in by the teams such as mental health support, alternatives to suspension, marginalized families outreach, teacher conflict resolution and diversity training skills, bullying prevention skills, positive school climate promotion, engagement with parenting skills and a focus on children?s language development etc.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

Reach Academy Feltham’s whole-school, whole-community response to COVID-19

1. School context

Reach Academy Feltham (RAF) is in West London. It has 900 pupils from ages 2 to 18. It is a Free School, meaning it is funded directly by the Department for Education and is independent of local government. The school serves a community with high levels of disadvantage, where many families find it difficult to access professional support services. RAF’s mission is to help all its pupils lead lives of choice and opportunity. It works closely with pupils and their families to overcome any barriers to doing well, at home and in the community. To support this, in 2017 RAF created Reach Children’s Hub, an organisation dedicated to extending RAF’s work with families, the local community, and other professional services in the area. The Hub works both with pupils and families from RAF and who attend other local schools. Ofsted, the English schools inspectorate, has graded RAF as an outstanding school.

2. Responding to COVID-19

A week and a half before the UK went into lockdown, RAF’s leadership team (the principals and senior staff) began planning their response to the crisis. Their priorities were to:
• provide high-quality, engaging learning for all pupils
• look after families’ well-being
• support the wider community
• look after the well-being of RAF staff.

RAF’s work to develop Reach Children’s Hub meant it already had some good links with other services and community groups locally. As a Free School, it was also used to working quickly and flexibly to respond to pupils’ and families’ needs. These factors meant RAF was able to act much more quickly in response to COVID-19 than was possible for local government organisations. RAF has stepped forward to take the lead on co-ordinating a multi-agency response to the crisis across the community. By taking this role, it has been able to secure a renewed commitment for services, community groups and schools to work together to meet people’s increasing needs.

 

 

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 4.4. Family learning; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams

Language: EN

Country: United Kingdom

School innovation in Europe: promoting students’ self-esteem and higher order thinking skills through curriculum innovation at the Willenhall Community Primary School

The school’s approach to teaching and learning is based on attaining educational excellence and achievement for all students. The school developed a stimulating curriculum which seeks to provide its students with an understanding of the learning processes in which they are involved (meta-cognition) – and to build their self-belief. The provision of specialist teaching in certain subject areas (science, music, art, physical education) is a key element in this process, as is the development of maths teaching throughout the school (for 6th graders). The teaching of philosophy to all students is also a vital element in developing students’ thinking skills, resilience and self-confidence. Curriculum innovation is undertaken on the initiative of the school, working in co-operation with its Federation partners at Whitmore Park Primary School. All staff, the governing body, students and parents are regularly consulted and made part of the process of curriculum development, and the school is strongly engaged with community partners in developing broader learning activities.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 1.3. School management; 1.4. Cooperation within education systems; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 4.1. Communication and information; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: United Kingdom