5. Stakeholders involvement

5.1. Multidisciplinary teams

A multidisciplinary approach to educational disadvantage and early school leaving (ESL) brings together professionals from within and beyond the school, including psychologists, social workers and health professionals. Multidisciplinary teams have the potential to offer a range of services to support young people at risk of educational disadvantage and ESL. This includes, for example, focus on children’s language development, mental health support, emotional support, bullying prevention skills, outreach to marginalised families and support for development of parenting skills.

Show more

Resources ( Search all resources )

Please note that for the moment the content on the resource pages is available in English only.

Multi-Interdisciplinary teams for early school leaving prevention

This paper seeks to examine evidence regarding the potential for multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary teams to play a key role in the prevention of early school leaving. As part of developing a strategy for such multi/interdisciplinary teams, an important focus is on necessary and supportive conditions for their effectiveness, rather than a deterministic assumption of their inevitable effectiveness. The report highlights the need to provide strong strategic guidance to the teams on important issues to be engaged in by the teams such as mental health support, alternatives to suspension, marginalized families outreach, teacher conflict resolution and diversity training skills, bullying prevention skills, positive school climate promotion, engagement with parenting skills and a focus on children?s language development etc.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

School innovation in Europe: making students the owners of their learning process though teacher empowerment in the Tjotter school

In 2011/2012, the Dutch School Inspectorate concluded that student results in the Tjotter school were too low. The school used to have a negative pedagogical climate, and suffered from a loss of trust between school and parents. Eventually, the school staff lost confidence in the former school leader and requested the school board to appoint a new leader. With an arrival of the current school leader four years ago, innovative processes started. A common view of education and teacher mutual learning was established, in addition to the culture of continuous improvement.

Key interventions:

  • improvement of teachers’ pedagogical and didactical skills: team schooling with subsequent follow up and monitoring within the learning community of teachers, individual coaching and change of personnel
  • creating student portfolios to make students the owners of their learning process while students were also encouraged to participate in its formation
  • other approaches being used at school: positive behaviour support; encouraging student participation and (direct) feedback on student’s results; ‘Teach like a Champion’; and HGW (Action Oriented Approach) for student differentiation.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 1.3. School management; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 2.4. Well-being of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 4.1. Communication and information; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks

Language: EN

Country: Netherlands

School innovation in Europe: promoting children’s continuous development through the integration of the school and day care centre and the application of the TASC model in the Warande school

In the past, the Dutch School Inspectorate notified the Warande school about their students‘ low results. The school staff, however, were very much hesitant towards the test-driven-accountability-approach established by the Inspectorate. Therefore, the school team decided to re-define and interpret test-driven accountability in their own way. Instead of emphasising the learning results per se, they wanted to focus on the process of learning itself – starting from children’s needs and guiding them in their own development.

To be able to focus on children’s continuous development, the school also felt the need to integrate the child day care, kindergarten, elementary education and after school care. These issues ignited the need for organisational and pedagogical changes. Overall, the school has been innovative during recent years, and latest innovative approaches represent a continuity of this process and reflect the school’s innovative culture.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Netherlands