4. Parental involvement

4.4. Family learning

‘Family learning’ refers to any activity that involves both children and adult family members (with all working toward their own learning outcomes) and that contributes to a culture of learning in the family. Raising the educational level of parents is one successful approach to preventing early school leaving. When parents engage in educational activities for themselves, a series of cultural and educational interactions are promoted within the family. 

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Please note that for the moment the content on the resource pages is available in English only.

Community-Based Lifelong Learning Centres

NESET - Network of Experts on Social Aspects of Education and Training publishes reports for policy makers and practitioners interested in promoting equity and inclusion in education and training across the European Union. This paper seeks to examine strategies for establishing community based lifelong learning centres in EU Member States. It explores evidence and research on the benefits and advantages of establishing such centres, as well as the barriers and difficulties impeding both the establishment and effectiveness of such centres. The report concludes that community based lifelong learning centres can simultaneously provide instantiations of a range of key lifelong learning objectives, such as active citizenship, social cohesion/inclusion, personal and social fulfillment, intercultural dialogue, as well as employment pathways.

Areas: 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 4.1. Communication and information; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

Education Endowment Foundation´s (EEF) parental engagement guidance report

The guidance report on “working with parents to support children´s learning“ is funded by the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) and focuses mostly on activities that aim to improve children’s learning directly. Thus, it reviews the best available research to offer schools and teachers four recommendations to support parental engagement in children’s learning. When it talks about ‘parental engagement’, ‘schools working with parents to improve children’s academic outcomes’ is meant. It is not a new study in itself, but rather is intended as an accessible overview of existing research with clear, actionable guidance. The guidance also draws on a wider body of evidence and expert input.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subarea: 4.4. Family learning

Language: EN

Country: United Kingdom

INCLUD-ED Family Education

Family Education is one of the Successful Educational Actions (SEAs) identified in the research project INCLUD-ED. It supports the promotion of cultural and educational interactions between students and social agents, and more particularly with family members and enhance students' achievement.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 4.4. Family learning; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

INCLUDE-ED Dialogic Literary Gatherings

Dialogic Literary Gatherings (DLG) is one of the Successful Educational Actions (SEAs) identified in the research project INCLUD-ED. DLG are used to improve education of children and youth in different contexts around the world. DLG is a dialogic reading activity based on two principles: reading a classical literature book (as Romeo and Juliet, the Odyssey, Don Quixote) and then sharing meanings, interpretations and reflections with the dialogic learning methodology. It can involve children and their family members. This example provides an understanding of DLG and the results of their practice.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement

Subareas: 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

LIT3 - Literacy cubed - Focus on Roma Families

LIT3 aims to promote family literacy (reading and health literacy) in Roma communities as a tool for raising the attainment level of Roma children in general education. To this end the project is developing and field testing a coherent family literacy programme targeting 3 generations; developing an evidence-based European policy for family literacy and engaging key stakeholders in developing local strategies for implementing family literacy policy and programmes. Samples of curricula and learning materials are available.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement

Subareas: 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 4.4. Family learning

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Romania; Slovakia; United Kingdom

Manchester Communication Academy (MCA)

Manchester Communication Academy (MCA) works to improve outcomes for children, families and the community. This secondary academy opened in 2010 to serve one of the most disadvantaged inner-city neighbourhoods in England. From the outset, the academy’s sponsor, a large employer in the city, wanted the school to help to contribute to a vibrant and sustainable neighbourhood, and committed to addressing the many inter-related economic, social and physical challenges which characterise the neighbourhood. This mission has directly shaped the academy programme, which places equal importance on ‘teaching and learning’ and ‘social investment’. The school’s social investment department is a highly distinctive feature of its overall strategy for addressing the impacts of disadvantage on young people’s education and wider life chances.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.3. School management; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: United Kingdom

NIACE Family Learning

NIACE?s Family Learning Inquiry for England and Wales demonstrates that through parents/carers accessing Family Learning provision there is positive impact in a range of cross-cutting policy areas affecting the lives of families. This impact is likely to reduce early school leaving due to the influence it has on families and provide a return on investment to society many times over.

Area: 4. Parental involvement

Subarea: 4.4. Family learning

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: United Kingdom

Parental Involvement for Early School Leaving Prevention

This report seeks to inform and guide the short and medium term strategic planning of the 10 Urbact - PREVENT city municipalities and all other municipalities, local authorities and schools across Europe with regard to parental involvement in education for prevention of early school leaving. This review is based on an analysis of EU Commission and Council documents on ESL and social inclusion, a dialogue and ongoing consultation process with the 10 municipalities engaged in the Urbact - PREVENT project and it interrogates international research relevant to this area. PREVENT is funded by the EU Urbact programme.

Areas: 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 4.1. Communication and information; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

Peep Learning Together Programme

The Peep Learning Together Programme (LTP) is run by Peeple Charity. It aims to raise children’s outcomes by helping them to make the most of their opportunities and to become confident communicators and active learners. By supporting parents/carers, the programme aims to improve children’s personal, social and emotional development, communication and language, early literacy, early numeracy and health and physical development.
The evidence-based Learning Together Programme values and extends what parents/carers already do. It helps strengthen adult-child relationships, building children’s self-esteem and emotional self-regulation. The programme offers key ideas and activities relating to child development that practitioners can share with parents/carers and their children. LTP helps parents and carers to: value and extend learning opportunities in everyday life; improve the quality of the home learning environment; develop secure attachment relationships with their children; and gain nationally-recognised units based on supporting their child's learning and development. Practitioners and parents can choose which and how many topics they want to focus on, depending on local needs and interests. Nationally-recognised adult learning units are embedded within the programme. These units are based on what parents/carers already do to support their child’s development, and how they have put into practice the knowledge gained while taking part in the programme. This builds parental capacity and “learner identity;, which research shows makes progress in volunteering, learning or work more likely.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 4.4. Family learning; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: United Kingdom

Reach Academy Feltham’s whole-school, whole-community response to COVID-19

1. School context

Reach Academy Feltham (RAF) is in West London. It has 900 pupils from ages 2 to 18. It is a Free School, meaning it is funded directly by the Department for Education and is independent of local government. The school serves a community with high levels of disadvantage, where many families find it difficult to access professional support services. RAF’s mission is to help all its pupils lead lives of choice and opportunity. It works closely with pupils and their families to overcome any barriers to doing well, at home and in the community. To support this, in 2017 RAF created Reach Children’s Hub, an organisation dedicated to extending RAF’s work with families, the local community, and other professional services in the area. The Hub works both with pupils and families from RAF and who attend other local schools. Ofsted, the English schools inspectorate, has graded RAF as an outstanding school.

2. Responding to COVID-19

A week and a half before the UK went into lockdown, RAF’s leadership team (the principals and senior staff) began planning their response to the crisis. Their priorities were to:
• provide high-quality, engaging learning for all pupils
• look after families’ well-being
• support the wider community
• look after the well-being of RAF staff.

RAF’s work to develop Reach Children’s Hub meant it already had some good links with other services and community groups locally. As a Free School, it was also used to working quickly and flexibly to respond to pupils’ and families’ needs. These factors meant RAF was able to act much more quickly in response to COVID-19 than was possible for local government organisations. RAF has stepped forward to take the lead on co-ordinating a multi-agency response to the crisis across the community. By taking this role, it has been able to secure a renewed commitment for services, community groups and schools to work together to meet people’s increasing needs.

 

 

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 4.4. Family learning; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams

Language: EN

Country: United Kingdom