4. Parental involvement

4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities

An effective way to create a positive family-school partnership and engage parents is to provide welcoming and safe opportunities for parents to be present at the school, share their expertise, build their confidence and their leadership capacities, social networks and learning. Parents and families may have designated time and spaces at the school. This could include, for example, a ‘parents’ room’ where informal activities may be organised at their request and/or with the help of other professionals (e.g. social workers) or school staff. The room could be used during school hours to organise talks on school and parenting issues, meetings with external specialists and professionals, workshops and other informal activities.

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Please note that for the moment the content on the resource pages is available in English only.

Choose Well - Help kids decide on their future

Making good choices regarding school subjects increases the chances of future success for students. This project involves parents and students in the process of making well-considered decisions about school subjects. It provides information on the Flemish education system.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 4.1. Communication and information; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Belgium

Community-Based Lifelong Learning Centres

NESET - Network of Experts on Social Aspects of Education and Training publishes reports for policy makers and practitioners interested in promoting equity and inclusion in education and training across the European Union. This paper seeks to examine strategies for establishing community based lifelong learning centres in EU Member States. It explores evidence and research on the benefits and advantages of establishing such centres, as well as the barriers and difficulties impeding both the establishment and effectiveness of such centres. The report concludes that community based lifelong learning centres can simultaneously provide instantiations of a range of key lifelong learning objectives, such as active citizenship, social cohesion/inclusion, personal and social fulfillment, intercultural dialogue, as well as employment pathways.

Areas: 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 4.1. Communication and information; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

INCLUD-ED Book on Successful Educational Actions

This monograph analyses and describes successful educational actions with a specific focus on vulnerable groups. Concrete data that shows success in school performance is provided, as well as on children, teachers and families accounts of the impact of this success. Alongside, there is an analysis of the relationship between these children?s educational performance with their inclusion or exclusion from different areas of society. This monograph provides actions for success identified through the INCLUD-ED project, thus providing both, contrasted data and solid theoretical background and development. Some examples of these actions are interactive groups, extension of the learning time, homework clubs, tutored libraries, family and community educative participation, family education, or dialogic literary gatherings. All these actions have been defined as successful educational actions, which mean that they lead to both efficiency and equity. Finally, recommendations for policy and practice are included and discussed.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement

Subareas: 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

INCLUD-ED Interactive Groups

Interactive Groups is one of the Successful Educational Actions (SEAs) identified in the research project INCLUD-ED. INCLUD-ED analysed educational strategies that contribute to overcoming inequalities and promote social cohesion, and those generating social exclusion, particularly focusing on vulnerable and marginalised groups. Interactive Groups are used to improve the education of children and youth in different contexts. They consist of grouping students in a class into small heterogeneous groups, each of them supported by an adult. Each of these groups is organised around four or five students, in a heterogeneous way regarding ability level, gender, culture, language and ethnicity. This example provides an understanding of IG and the results of their practice.

Areas: 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement

Subareas: 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

INCLUDE-ED Dialogic Literary Gatherings

Dialogic Literary Gatherings (DLG) is one of the Successful Educational Actions (SEAs) identified in the research project INCLUD-ED. DLG are used to improve education of children and youth in different contexts around the world. DLG is a dialogic reading activity based on two principles: reading a classical literature book (as Romeo and Juliet, the Odyssey, Don Quixote) and then sharing meanings, interpretations and reflections with the dialogic learning methodology. It can involve children and their family members. This example provides an understanding of DLG and the results of their practice.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement

Subareas: 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

JOAQUIM RUYRA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, the Miracle School (Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain)

The Joaquim Ruyra Elementary School is located in a disadvantaged suburban district of Barcelona. In the 2016-2017 school year, 92% students were immigrants representing 28 different nationalities (including Pakistan, Morocco, Georgia, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Peru, the Philippines, China, Bangladesh, Senegal, and the USA) or from minority background (Romani). The school has a 40% mobility rate.  

National and international press have referred to the school as the miracle school as it had achieved academic outcomes above the average in the Catalan standardised tests, outperforming elite schools in the Catalonia region.

All classes in the school feature group work 40% to 60% of the time. The groups mix students of different abilities, genders and nationalities.  The small groups are designed to ensure that no one is left out, and students are encouraged to participate actively.  Each group is facilitated by an adult (e.g. a classroom assistants, a parent).  Psychologists and special education teachers may also work in the classrooms, and they support volunteer parents, teachers and the students.  The extra support and student interaction are considered as essential for supporting and reinforcing children’s learning. 

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 1.3. School management; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 4.1. Communication and information; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Spain

Joy of Reading

Joy of Reading is a three-year (2012-2015) national literacy programme led by the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture and implemented by the University of Oulu Faculty of Humanities (Information Studies) and Faculty of Education.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL

Country: Finland

KAAP - parents language learning initiative in Antwerp

KAAP is an initiative of De Scholbrug (the 'Schoolbridge'), an NGO based in Antwerp (Belgium-Flanders) which aims to create links between schools, parents and pupils, with a special focus on socially vulnerable families. The KAAP project focuses on providing migrant parents with Dutch language lessons at their children's school.

Area: 4. Parental involvement

Subarea: 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Belgium

Manchester Communication Academy (MCA)

Manchester Communication Academy (MCA) works to improve outcomes for children, families and the community. This secondary academy opened in 2010 to serve one of the most disadvantaged inner-city neighbourhoods in England. From the outset, the academy’s sponsor, a large employer in the city, wanted the school to help to contribute to a vibrant and sustainable neighbourhood, and committed to addressing the many inter-related economic, social and physical challenges which characterise the neighbourhood. This mission has directly shaped the academy programme, which places equal importance on ‘teaching and learning’ and ‘social investment’. The school’s social investment department is a highly distinctive feature of its overall strategy for addressing the impacts of disadvantage on young people’s education and wider life chances.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.3. School management; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: United Kingdom

Mothers café

The involvement of parents with migrant background in school life can be done through provision of language or other courses. In Nordrhein Westfahlen in Germany it is frequent to organise international, intercultural associations of mothers of different nationalities, often in combination with teaching of German. For example, in the town of Hilden, mothers meet once a week in the premises of the elementary school, where childcare and professional facilitation is provided, allowing mothers of different origin to exchange experiences, improve German language skills, hear tips on parenting etc.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement

Subareas: 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Germany

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