3. Support to learners

3.4. Curriculum and learning paths

Making learning relevant to learners' lives is crucial. Relevant and stimulating curricula will assist teachers to create motivating lessons. Curricula should allow personalised forms of teaching and learning, to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge and development of skills and competencies to the best ability of each child, while preserving the quality of the curriculum content and high expectations. Curricula at each stage should be aligned with subsequent levels of education and training or alternative training pathways.

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Please note that for the moment the content on the resource pages is available in English only.

Beda School upper secondary

This example describes innovative approaches in an upper secondary school in Sweden - Beda Hallberg. The school offers a range of programmes that provide the foundation for personal development and active participation in society. The school also aims to provide continued support to learners and reduce the risk of drop-out by working hard to minimizes the closing times of the school with the view to staying open during some longer holidays. A team of health professionals are also well represented and includes social and psychological counsellors available to support the needs of young people.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.5. Learning and assessment

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Sweden

Nordic Projects to Combat School Dropout

The aim of the report Nordic Projects to Combat School Dropout is to improve and inspire new initiatives for young people, and to create enriching contacts between actors and organisations in the Nordic region.
The Nordic Web Resource on Dropout from Upper Secondary Education was a project commissioned by the Nordic Council of Ministers and run by the Nordic Welfare Centre between 2012 and 2015. The aim of the project was to compile good examples of initiatives aimed at increasing the proportion of young people in the Nordic region who complete upper secondary education.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 1.3. School management; 1.4. Cooperation within education systems; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 2.4. Well-being of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 3.8. Targeted support - Language; 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 4.1. Communication and information; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Denmark; Finland; Iceland; Norway; Sweden

ProsocialLearn

ProsocialLearn is creating fun educational games for children to learn social and emotional well-being skills. By working together, teachers and game developers are creating new learning opportunities for inclusive education. The project wants to create a prosocial game development and distribution platform in order to distribute prosocial digital games from game companies to the educational sector and work with communities of teachers in Europe to evaluate their approach. Digital games can be tailored to teach the benefits of cooperation, as well as the ability to recognise the emotions of others and express trustworthiness – prosocial skills – helping children to appreciate team-work, recognise the value of understanding other people’s needs and achieve academically.
The games are targeted in particular at children at risk of social exclusion, who find it difficult to show empathy, and include hidden indicators that measure the development of a child’s skills. ProsocialLearn also developed a platform where teachers can track their pupils’ progress and plan lessons that incorporate the games.

Areas: 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners

Subareas: 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.5. Learning and assessment

Language: EN

Country: Finland; Germany; Greece; Italy; Romania; Spain; Sweden; United Kingdom

School innovation in Europe: improving students’ reading comprehension skills through teaching of reading strategies in Centralskolan

For Arvika, Centralskolan is a big school with students coming from the city centre and surrounding areas. Students are from very mixed backgrounds, including students from disadvantaged areas. Several years ago, the school had a significant number of students whose academic achievements after the 9th grade were not sufficient for entering an upper secondary education. One of the key issues in Centralskolan, as well as in other surrounding schools, was that the student reading comprehension skills across various subjects were poor. Subjects of maths and science have been extra prioritised by Centralskolan as student results within those subjects were especially low. Therefore, the school has started practising an explicit teaching of reading strategies within specific subjects for grades 7 – 9. These reading strategies have been implemented together with scaffolding, which means that a teacher gradually empowers students to lead a reading and text comprehension exercise.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.4. Cooperation within education systems; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 4.1. Communication and information; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams

Language: EN

Country: Sweden