2. Teachers

2.1. Teacher skills and competences

The role of the teacher is broadening and becoming more demanding. Teachers are expected to use a wide variety of methods, tools and approaches and to tailor them to the learners' needs. They also need to have competences and skills necessary to create a positive classroom environment and work collaboratively with other stakeholders within and outside the school in order to provide timely support to learners.

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Please note that for the moment the content on the resource pages is available in English only.

Action Antibullying (AAB)

The project partners designed and implemented a new anti-bullying programme in schools in five EU countries. It drew on the experiences of existing programmes and practices originated by the project partners working in different cultural contexts.  It provided further evidence of effective approaches to the reduction of bullying in schools that will inform the development of improved child centred, whole school strategies for adoption at European level.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.3. School management; 1.4. Cooperation within education systems; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Italy; Romania; Slovenia; Spain; United Kingdom

INCLUD-ED Interactive Groups

Interactive Groups is one of the Successful Educational Actions (SEAs) identified in the research project INCLUD-ED. INCLUD-ED analysed educational strategies that contribute to overcoming inequalities and promote social cohesion, and those generating social exclusion, particularly focusing on vulnerable and marginalised groups. Interactive Groups are used to improve the education of children and youth in different contexts. They consist of grouping students in a class into small heterogeneous groups, each of them supported by an adult. Each of these groups is organised around four or five students, in a heterogeneous way regarding ability level, gender, culture, language and ethnicity. This example provides an understanding of IG and the results of their practice.

Areas: 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement

Subareas: 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

Manchester Communication Academy (MCA)

Manchester Communication Academy (MCA) works to improve outcomes for children, families and the community. This secondary academy opened in 2010 to serve one of the most disadvantaged inner-city neighbourhoods in England. From the outset, the academy’s sponsor, a large employer in the city, wanted the school to help to contribute to a vibrant and sustainable neighbourhood, and committed to addressing the many inter-related economic, social and physical challenges which characterise the neighbourhood. This mission has directly shaped the academy programme, which places equal importance on ‘teaching and learning’ and ‘social investment’. The school’s social investment department is a highly distinctive feature of its overall strategy for addressing the impacts of disadvantage on young people’s education and wider life chances.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.3. School management; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: United Kingdom

Rights Respecting Schools Award (RRSA), UK

Rights Respecting Schools (RRS) is a UNICEF-UK driven approach that integrates the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) as a whole school approach to child rights education. The overall aim of the approach is to create a participative, inclusive, and safe school culture, where respect for every member of the school community is guaranteed. The UNICEF Child Rights Education (CRE) Toolkit provides guidance on how to become a Rights Respecting School. Schools adapt the RRS approach to their context. The approach influences relationships between every actor in the school environment and is applicable in any school context. The framework outlined in the RRS toolkit is intended to provide a central organising principle for the entire school and, by extension, for the families and community in which the school is situated. There are three phases of development. The second and third phases (Levels 1 and 2) are similar. The aim is to execute the action plan that is developed during the Recognition of Commitment phase in order to reach the four standards of the RRSA: 1. Rights-respecting values underpin leadership and management 2. The entire school community learns about the CRC 3. The school has a rights-respecting ethos 4. Children are empowered to become active citizens and learners.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 1.3. School management; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.4. Well-being of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 4.1. Communication and information; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: United Kingdom

School innovation in Europe: Curriculum innovation for a conductive and supporting learning environment at the President Kennedy School in Coventry

The school’s philosophy in relation to teaching and learning is focused students’ active understanding of and participation in the learning process. The school’s curriculum is based on the principles of progression and coherence.

‘The Bridge’ is one of the key innovative practices implemented at the school. It consists of a curriculum innovation established to provide a conducive and supportive learning environment for students entering secondary education at age 11. Learning is project-based and delivered by teams of teachers from different areas of the curriculum, which enables students to engage with a small number of teachers, and to work on clearly defined and cohesive learning objectives. The five principles underpinning the Bridge are: Achievement; Belonging; Celebration; Discipline; Enrichment. The students are empowered as independent learners – throughout their time at the school – and beyond. A rewards system enables students to earn points towards prizes at the end of the year.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 1.3. School management; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 4.1. Communication and information; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: United Kingdom

School innovation in Europe: promoting students’ self-esteem and higher order thinking skills through curriculum innovation at the Willenhall Community Primary School

The school’s approach to teaching and learning is based on attaining educational excellence and achievement for all students. The school developed a stimulating curriculum which seeks to provide its students with an understanding of the learning processes in which they are involved (meta-cognition) – and to build their self-belief. The provision of specialist teaching in certain subject areas (science, music, art, physical education) is a key element in this process, as is the development of maths teaching throughout the school (for 6th graders). The teaching of philosophy to all students is also a vital element in developing students’ thinking skills, resilience and self-confidence. Curriculum innovation is undertaken on the initiative of the school, working in co-operation with its Federation partners at Whitmore Park Primary School. All staff, the governing body, students and parents are regularly consulted and made part of the process of curriculum development, and the school is strongly engaged with community partners in developing broader learning activities.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 1.3. School management; 1.4. Cooperation within education systems; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 4.1. Communication and information; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: United Kingdom

Talk of the Town (ToTT)

The ‘Talk of the Town’ (ToTT) intervention was developed by The Communication Trust and ICAN – two UK-based speech, language and communication NGOs. ToTT was piloted across a small federation of schools (secondary and primary) in Manchester in an area of social deprivation in 2011- 2012 to address developmental delays in children’s speech language and communication (SLC). It is an integrated, community-led and systematic approach to supporting SLC in children and young people. The importance of detection and support of learners with learning difficulties before the problem is translated into school absenteeism is essential. Research has pointed to the need to identify at-risk learners and rapidly intervene at the appropriate level, in this case a targeted approach being the most applicable. ToTT follows a systematic process to embed strategies and achieve measurable positive outcomes. It was piloted with four key aims: 1. Early identification of children and young people with SLC needs 2. Joint working between parents and practitioners across health and education 3. Positive outcomes for children and young people with improved SLC skills 4. A sustainable approach, so that policy and practice continues to support positive outcomes.

 

 

 

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 4.1. Communication and information; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: United Kingdom