2. Teachers

2.1. Teacher skills and competences

The role of the teacher is broadening and becoming more demanding. Teachers are expected to use a wide variety of methods, tools and approaches and to tailor them to the learners' needs. They also need to have competences and skills necessary to create a positive classroom environment and work collaboratively with other stakeholders within and outside the school in order to provide timely support to learners.

Show more

Resources ( Search all resources )

Please note that for the moment the content on the resource pages is available in English only.

Essunga Municipality Schools

Essunga, a Swedish municipality, transformed the ranking of its schools from the bottom to the top of the national school league tables between 2007 to the top in 2010. Essunga has three elementary schools and one lower secondary school (grades 6-9). With 5,500 citizens, it is one of the smallest municipalities in the country. The increase in levels of achievement is attributed to a research-based approach of inclusive education. For years, the three elementary schools in Essunga had consistently experienced low educational levels. An increasing number of students were refugees or in “family placements”. In 2007, only 76% of students were eligible for upper secondary school and 20% of these were placed in special education classes. These results compelled political and school leaders and school staff to identify targeted measures to address these challenges. The municipality focused on interventions at school and in the local community to prevent school absence and increase attendance.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.3. School management; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties

Language: EN

Country: Sweden

INCLUD-ED Interactive Groups

Interactive Groups is one of the Successful Educational Actions (SEAs) identified in the research project INCLUD-ED. INCLUD-ED analysed educational strategies that contribute to overcoming inequalities and promote social cohesion, and those generating social exclusion, particularly focusing on vulnerable and marginalised groups. Interactive Groups are used to improve the education of children and youth in different contexts. They consist of grouping students in a class into small heterogeneous groups, each of them supported by an adult. Each of these groups is organised around four or five students, in a heterogeneous way regarding ability level, gender, culture, language and ethnicity. This example provides an understanding of IG and the results of their practice.

Areas: 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement

Subareas: 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

Nordic Projects to Combat School Dropout

The aim of the report Nordic Projects to Combat School Dropout is to improve and inspire new initiatives for young people, and to create enriching contacts between actors and organisations in the Nordic region.
The Nordic Web Resource on Dropout from Upper Secondary Education was a project commissioned by the Nordic Council of Ministers and run by the Nordic Welfare Centre between 2012 and 2015. The aim of the project was to compile good examples of initiatives aimed at increasing the proportion of young people in the Nordic region who complete upper secondary education.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 1.3. School management; 1.4. Cooperation within education systems; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 2.4. Well-being of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 3.8. Targeted support - Language; 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 4.1. Communication and information; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Denmark; Finland; Iceland; Norway; Sweden

School innovation in Europe: improving students’ reading comprehension skills through teaching of reading strategies in Centralskolan

For Arvika, Centralskolan is a big school with students coming from the city centre and surrounding areas. Students are from very mixed backgrounds, including students from disadvantaged areas. Several years ago, the school had a significant number of students whose academic achievements after the 9th grade were not sufficient for entering an upper secondary education. One of the key issues in Centralskolan, as well as in other surrounding schools, was that the student reading comprehension skills across various subjects were poor. Subjects of maths and science have been extra prioritised by Centralskolan as student results within those subjects were especially low. Therefore, the school has started practising an explicit teaching of reading strategies within specific subjects for grades 7 – 9. These reading strategies have been implemented together with scaffolding, which means that a teacher gradually empowers students to lead a reading and text comprehension exercise.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.4. Cooperation within education systems; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 4.1. Communication and information; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams

Language: EN

Country: Sweden