5. Stakeholders involvement

The complex nature of early school leaving (ESL) requires a multi-dimensional response. Some of its causes are linked to factors outside the education system, such as personal, health or emotional difficulties, family problems or fragile socio-economic circumstances. School staff do not (and cannot) have the capacity to address all of these challenges, so it is essential that they work with wider stakeholders with the appropriate expertise.

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Community-Based Lifelong Learning Centres

NESET - Network of Experts on Social Aspects of Education and Training publishes reports for policy makers and practitioners interested in promoting equity and inclusion in education and training across the European Union. This paper seeks to examine strategies for establishing community based lifelong learning centres in EU Member States. It explores evidence and research on the benefits and advantages of establishing such centres, as well as the barriers and difficulties impeding both the establishment and effectiveness of such centres. The report concludes that community based lifelong learning centres can simultaneously provide instantiations of a range of key lifelong learning objectives, such as active citizenship, social cohesion/inclusion, personal and social fulfillment, intercultural dialogue, as well as employment pathways.

Areas: 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 4.1. Communication and information; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

INCLUD-ED Family Education

Family Education is one of the Successful Educational Actions (SEAs) identified in the research project INCLUD-ED. It supports the promotion of cultural and educational interactions between students and social agents, and more particularly with family members and enhance students' achievement.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 4.4. Family learning; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

Malmaskolan

To improve student success and prevent early school leaving, the Malmaskolan established a Student Health Team, comprised of a school nurse, a special education teacher, the principal, the school counselor, the leisure-time pedagogues, the study and career counselor, a social worker, the school physician and a school psychologist. Since 2005, this Health Team has been the core for the development of teaching at the school, and is a hub for both teaching and school development. They have open meetings thrice weekly where teachers can discuss issues, and where a wide range of potential measures to support students is identified.

Areas: 1. School governance; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.4. Well-being of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams

Language: EN

Country: Sweden

Multi-Interdisciplinary teams for early school leaving prevention

This paper seeks to examine evidence regarding the potential for multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary teams to play a key role in the prevention of early school leaving. As part of developing a strategy for such multi/interdisciplinary teams, an important focus is on necessary and supportive conditions for their effectiveness, rather than a deterministic assumption of their inevitable effectiveness. The report highlights the need to provide strong strategic guidance to the teams on important issues to be engaged in by the teams such as mental health support, alternatives to suspension, marginalized families outreach, teacher conflict resolution and diversity training skills, bullying prevention skills, positive school climate promotion, engagement with parenting skills and a focus on children?s language development etc.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

Nordic Projects to Combat School Dropout

The aim of the report Nordic Projects to Combat School Dropout is to improve and inspire new initiatives for young people, and to create enriching contacts between actors and organisations in the Nordic region.
The Nordic Web Resource on Dropout from Upper Secondary Education was a project commissioned by the Nordic Council of Ministers and run by the Nordic Welfare Centre between 2012 and 2015. The aim of the project was to compile good examples of initiatives aimed at increasing the proportion of young people in the Nordic region who complete upper secondary education.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.2. School planning and monitoring; 1.3. School management; 1.4. Cooperation within education systems; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 2.4. Well-being of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.5. Learning and assessment; 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 3.8. Targeted support - Language; 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 4.1. Communication and information; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.3. Partnerships - employers and businesses; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Denmark; Finland; Iceland; Norway; Sweden

Parental Involvement for Early School Leaving Prevention

This report seeks to inform and guide the short and medium term strategic planning of the 10 Urbact - PREVENT city municipalities and all other municipalities, local authorities and schools across Europe with regard to parental involvement in education for prevention of early school leaving. This review is based on an analysis of EU Commission and Council documents on ESL and social inclusion, a dialogue and ongoing consultation process with the 10 municipalities engaged in the Urbact - PREVENT project and it interrogates international research relevant to this area. PREVENT is funded by the EU Urbact programme.

Areas: 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 4.1. Communication and information; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

PlugInnovation platform

PlugInnovation is a digital platform with an ambition to become a national resource cluster for dropout-prevention. The website will collect information, statistics, research and examples of successful actions taken by the schools with the aim of preventing early school leaving.

Areas: 1. School governance; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Sweden

School innovation in Europe: improving students’ reading comprehension skills through teaching of reading strategies in Centralskolan

For Arvika, Centralskolan is a big school with students coming from the city centre and surrounding areas. Students are from very mixed backgrounds, including students from disadvantaged areas. Several years ago, the school had a significant number of students whose academic achievements after the 9th grade were not sufficient for entering an upper secondary education. One of the key issues in Centralskolan, as well as in other surrounding schools, was that the student reading comprehension skills across various subjects were poor. Subjects of maths and science have been extra prioritised by Centralskolan as student results within those subjects were especially low. Therefore, the school has started practising an explicit teaching of reading strategies within specific subjects for grades 7 – 9. These reading strategies have been implemented together with scaffolding, which means that a teacher gradually empowers students to lead a reading and text comprehension exercise.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.4. Cooperation within education systems; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 4.1. Communication and information; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams

Language: EN

Country: Sweden

The Tolerance Project

Teachers, social workers and community youth workers in Kungälv work together to identify high-school teenagers in or at risk of joining neo-Nazi gangs. They map local social structures and interrelationships to identify trouble spots and at-risk youth. The project then works with them to disassemble toxic activities and connects them to more positive relationships, activities and influences. The model also includes a wider spectrum of stakeholders committed to influencing society’s attitudes.

Research shows a connection between leaving education and destructive environments, so another important long-term project goal is to ensure that the participating students complete the compulsory nine-year school system, and continue onto upper secondary school.
Impact - Today, there are no active Nazi or white supremacist organisations in Kungälv and no informal gangs. The Kungälv Model was replicated in 20 other cities in Sweden in the 2015/2016 academic year, (with $1 million investment from Ministry of Labour, the National Agency for Youth and Civil Society Affairs, Natur & Kultur Foundation, and Skandia Ideas for Life).

The Kungälv model has been highlighted by the UN as a viable and appropriate strategy to counter extreme intolerance among youths.

www.toleransprojektet.se

 

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 3.11. Targeted support - disadvantaged socio-economic background; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Sweden