5. Stakeholders involvement

The complex nature of early school leaving (ESL) requires a multi-dimensional response. Some of its causes are linked to factors outside the education system, such as personal, health or emotional difficulties, family problems or fragile socio-economic circumstances. School staff do not (and cannot) have the capacity to address all of these challenges, so it is essential that they work with wider stakeholders with the appropriate expertise.

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Please note that for the moment the content on the resource pages is available in English only.

Action Antibullying (AAB)

The project partners designed and implemented a new anti-bullying programme in schools in five EU countries. It drew on the experiences of existing programmes and practices originated by the project partners working in different cultural contexts.  It provided further evidence of effective approaches to the reduction of bullying in schools that will inform the development of improved child centred, whole school strategies for adoption at European level.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 1.3. School management; 1.4. Cooperation within education systems; 2.1. Teacher skills and competences; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.10. Targeted support - special educational needs and learning difficulties; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Italy; Romania; Slovenia; Spain; United Kingdom

Brave’s Club: Zero Violence from age zero

To improve the school climate, a group of schools from the Learning Communities project decided to create the Brave’s Club. It is based on a “dialogical model of conflict prevention”. Since the Club started in 2014, it has made progress in eradicating school violence in both primary and secondary schools. This strategy is making it easier to bring together effective evidence-informed practices on preventing violence in classrooms in general, and more specifically, gender violence.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 2.2. Teachers and their relationships with pupils and parents; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: EN

Country: Spain

Checklist and recommendations for prevention of absenteeism and school drop-out

It is undeniable that medical, psychological, social, educational and legal interventions are required in a number of cases of truancy and early school leaving, but research also shows clearly that in all cases, school and teaching staff can have a decisive influence. This document comprises a checklist for self-assessment of schools, 59 detailed recommendations for improvement of school attendance, pupil engagement and school culture, as well as proposals for behaviour agreements and examples of questionnaires for teachers and parents. The recommended measures are primarily directed at the target group of teachers, principals and parents. The document has been translated from the manual by Nairz-Wirth, Feldmann, Diexer (2012): Handlungsempfehlungen für Lehrende, Schulleitung und Eltern zur erfolgreichen Prävention von Schulabsentismus und Schulabbruch.

Picture: Shutterstock.com

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 2.3. Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development of teachers; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.6. Extended and extra-curricular learning; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk; 4.1. Communication and information; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Austria

Choose Well - Help kids decide on their future

Making good choices regarding school subjects increases the chances of future success for students. This project involves parents and students in the process of making well-considered decisions about school subjects. It provides information on the Flemish education system.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 3.2. Learners' participation in school life; 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.4. Curriculum and learning paths; 3.9. Targeted support: Migrants, Roma; 4.1. Communication and information; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Belgium

Community-Based Lifelong Learning Centres

NESET - Network of Experts on Social Aspects of Education and Training publishes reports for policy makers and practitioners interested in promoting equity and inclusion in education and training across the European Union. This paper seeks to examine strategies for establishing community based lifelong learning centres in EU Member States. It explores evidence and research on the benefits and advantages of establishing such centres, as well as the barriers and difficulties impeding both the establishment and effectiveness of such centres. The report concludes that community based lifelong learning centres can simultaneously provide instantiations of a range of key lifelong learning objectives, such as active citizenship, social cohesion/inclusion, personal and social fulfillment, intercultural dialogue, as well as employment pathways.

Areas: 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 4.1. Communication and information; 4.3. Spaces for parents and involvement in educational activities; 4.4. Family learning; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Albania; Austria; Belgium; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Iceland; Ireland; Italy; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Malta; Netherlands; North Macedonia; Norway; Poland; Portugal; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Turkey; United Kingdom

Does intensive coaching reduce school dropout?

Research done in the Netherlands has shown that one year of intensive coaching is likely to reduce school dropout by more than 40 percent and yield a net social gain. The target group of students was the general population of students starting in intermediate vocational education. Results suggest that the largest gains are made in the first year of coaching and effects are largest for students with a larger ex-ante probability of school dropout. Examples of coaching are working on study skills (e.g., planning and organizing), counselling in case of personal problems and contact with parents. Both preventive (before study dropout) and curative actions (among study dropouts) of the coaches have been effective and together resulted in a substantial reduction of school dropout.

Picture: Shutterstock.com

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 3.3. Career guidance and support; 3.7. Monitoring learners at risk

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Netherlands

Drop-out network and Central helpdesk in Antwerp city

The Drop-out prevention network provides a whole suite of services and expertise. Each project is unique, focused on specific target groups and attracts its own level of funding. Emphasis is put on prevention of early school leaving and re-integration of pupils who have dropped out of school. The Central Helpdesk provides support to pupils and to schools. Frequently absent students are referred to the Pupil Guidance Centre attached to the school network which the school is part of. Where necessary the Pupil Guidance Centre seek the help of the Central Helpdesk. The Helpdesk can offer tailored support measures and activities to pupils at risk or those who have dropped out through the network of different organisations.

Area: 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams; 5.2. Stakeholders' networks; 5.4. Partnerships: Community organisations and civic society

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Belgium

Education Endowment Foundation´s (EEF) parental engagement guidance report

The guidance report on “working with parents to support children´s learning“ is funded by the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) and focuses mostly on activities that aim to improve children’s learning directly. Thus, it reviews the best available research to offer schools and teachers four recommendations to support parental engagement in children’s learning. When it talks about ‘parental engagement’, ‘schools working with parents to improve children’s academic outcomes’ is meant. It is not a new study in itself, but rather is intended as an accessible overview of existing research with clear, actionable guidance. The guidance also draws on a wider body of evidence and expert input.

Areas: 1. School governance; 2. Teachers; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subarea: 4.4. Family learning

Language: EN

Country: United Kingdom

European Network Against Bullying in Learning and Leisure Environments (ENABLE)

This project is designed to support the development of Social-Emotional Learning skills (SEL) for 11-14 year olds, and to promote Peer Support to tackle and reduce bullying. SEL Programmes improve the student's social, emotional and academic skills, which include more pro-social behaviour and positive attitudes toward the self and others, and lower levels of emotional distress. Peer support systems reduce the negative impact of bullying on victims and make it more acceptable for them to report it. It follows a whole-school approach which includes young people, staff, parents and the wider community. Thus, this programme is a departure from the two-dimensional view of bullying as victim and bully, and instead looks at the social and group dynamics in a school or leisure environment to address a range of factors which contribute to bullying. ENABLE has trained a team of Ambassadors in each participating country, who are available to provide information and guidance to any school or organisation wishing to implement the programme.

Areas: 1. School governance; 3. Support to learners; 4. Parental involvement; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 1.1. School culture and climate; 3.1. Well-being of learners; 4.2. Parents' involvement in school governance

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: Belgium; Croatia; Denmark; Greece; Romania; United Kingdom

Feel Well, Learn Better - ABMA program in France

The 'Feel Well, Learn Better (Aller bien pour mieux comprendre - ABMA)' measure builds on the consideration given to pupils' overall health to improve the school environment and school achievement, thus reducing health inequalities. It promotes harmonious interactions and well-being among pupils and staff. This is a pilot programme that will run for 3 years until 2016, under the Lyon Education Authority, in partnership with the National Institute for Prevention and Health Education.

Areas: 3. Support to learners; 5. Stakeholders involvement

Subareas: 3.1. Well-being of learners; 5.1. Multidisciplinary teams

Language: BG; CZ; DA; DE; EL; EN; ES; ET; FI; FR; HR; HU; IT; LT; LV; MT; NL; PL; PT; RO; SK; SL; SV

Country: France

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